SECOND MEETING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN SECTIONS
INTERNATIONAL PLUTARCH SOCIETY
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences"
15-18 May, 2019
HIGHLY CUSTOMIZABLE THEME
SECOND MEETING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN SECTIONS
INTERNATIONAL PLUTARCH SOCIETY
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences"
15-18 May, 2019
HIGHLY CUSTOMIZABLE THEME
SECOND MEETING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN SECTIONS
INTERNATIONAL PLUTARCH SOCIETY
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences"
15-18 May, 2019
By Itidorfa07 (Own work) CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons (cropped from original)
Lion of Chaeronea Statue

Abstract Details

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5/16/2019  |   10:00 AM - 10:45 AM   |  Hampton Inn Conference Room

The Peek-a-boo Presence of Aeschines in Plutarch’s Life of Demosthenes

At Demosthenes 15.5 Plutarch calls into question Idomeneus’ claim that Aeschines was acquitted by 30 votes in the trial over his actions on the Second Embassy to Philip. Plutarch states, however, that it is unclear whether Demosthenes’ speech (Demosthenes 19) on the false embassy was ever delivered. He draws this conclusion based, it would seem, on his own reading of Aeschines and Demosthenes: “But it would seem to hold no truth, if one must judge by the speeches on the crown (Demosthenes 18 & Aeschines 3) written by each man, for neither of them has distinctly and clearly mentioned the suit as actually coming to trial”. Plutarch’s words suggests familiarity on his part with these two speeches, which serve as important sources for the life. At least on two prior occasions (17.3 & 9.6) the two speeches, respectively, are unnamed sources of information. In the case of Aeschines, his presence looms large in the first twenty-four chapters of the life until is voluntary exile to Rhodes, the result of failing to receive one-fifth of the vote in his suit against Ctesiphon. Plutarch references Aeschines several times in these first chapters as a source, but ignores at times important details, which Aeschines provides about Demosthenes. In this paper I would like to explore why Plutarch includes what he does, and at times excludes or at least is silent on certain other details from Aeschines.

Craig Cooper (Primary Presenter), craig.cooper@uleth.ca;
Dr. Craig Cooper is currently the Dean of Arts and Science at the University of Lethbridge. Before coming to the Lethbridge, he served a five-year term as Dean of Arts and Science at Nipissing University, and prior to that, for 15 years was member of the Professoriate at the University of Winnipeg. He received his BA from the University of Alberta, and his MA and PhD from the University of British Columbia. He is a Classicist, who works in the areas of Athenian Law, the Athenian Orators and Greek Rhetoric, Greek Historiography and Ancient Greek Biography. He has taught and published in all these areas.

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