SECOND MEETING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN SECTIONS
INTERNATIONAL PLUTARCH SOCIETY
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences"
15-18 May, 2019
HIGHLY CUSTOMIZABLE THEME
SECOND MEETING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN SECTIONS
INTERNATIONAL PLUTARCH SOCIETY
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences"
15-18 May, 2019
HIGHLY CUSTOMIZABLE THEME
SECOND MEETING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN SECTIONS
INTERNATIONAL PLUTARCH SOCIETY
"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences"
15-18 May, 2019
By Itidorfa07 (Own work) CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons (cropped from original)
Lion of Chaeronea Statue

Abstract Details

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5/15/2019  |   11:30 AM - 12:00 PM   |  Hampton Inn Conference Room

The Repulsa of Aemilius in Plutarch's Aemilius Paulus

In the Life of Aemilius Paulus, Plutarch provides very little information about Aemilius’ life and career before the Third Macedonian War. Silence on the childhood and early life of a subject is not unusual, but it is remarkable that Plutarch fails to mention Aemilius’ difficulties in winning his first consulship in 182 BC, which we know from Livy (39.32.6). Plutarch does, however, report a repulsa in Aemilius’ bid for a second consulship, which Tensey has argued should be dated to 171 BC, Livy makes no mention of this repulsa. Since Plutarch, and Plutarch alone, reports Aemilius’ initial failure in seeking his second consulship, it is possible that he has displaced or transposed a historical repulsa from the 180s into the 170s. Beginning with Tensey’s argument for the dating of Aemilius’ repulsa and Pelling’s discussion of Plutarch’s use of chronological displacement and transference for compositional purposes (Pelling 1995), I will argue that Plutarch omits Aemilius’ earlier repulsa(e) but highlights a later repulsa (whether historical or not) in order to enhance the contrast which he constructs between his Roman subject and the last king of Macedonia, Perseus.

Colin Bailey (Primary Presenter), baileyc26@macewan.ca;
Colin Bailey is Associate Professor of Classics at MacEwan University. His research interests focus on Roman imperialism during the republican period, Greek and Roman interactions, and the Second Sophistic. Recent publications include a study of Dio Chrysostom's Thirty-First Oration and Rome's relationship with Carthage in the first half of the second century BC.

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